Mr. Patterson's Blog

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Macbeth MacMovie

Hey Gang,

Just wanted to give people a quick heads up on where we’re at as of now. We have completed reading the first two acts of Macbeth and have watched 2 different adaptations, a feature film by Roman Polanski and a made for television version by the BBC. I’ve embedded the BBC film here:

Today we will do the following:

a. Complete watching the film up to the end of Act II

b. Talk about the choices made and how they are different from the text

c. Read some of Act III

d. Assigned homework: Read until the end of the fourth scene in Act III

Also, I handed back the rhetorical devices assignment. In general they were well done but some people only really managed to do 2 of the three parts of the questions. Remember you had to a) Find an example of a rhetorical device b) explain HOW it’s used and c) explain WHY it’s used. Just about all of you managed the first part, most the second but some had trouble with the third. Here’s an example of somebody who managed all three parts well:

A few examples of proper answers:

These answers provide all three pieces of information. If you attempted the third part but your explanation was unclear and confusing, you most likely got a 2.5.

An example of a incomplete answer might be this one…(DON’T WORRY, I MADE THIS ONE UP. I’M NOT HANGING ANYONE OUT TO DRY)

PARADOX

“When the hurlyburly’s done, when the battle’s lost and won”

This is a paradox. It is a paradox because the statement seems to contradict itself, implying that an army can both win and lose a battle.

This satisfies two parts of the answer but not the third. You need to explain what this contradiction means in the context of the play. For example…

“When the hurlyburly’s done, when the battle’s lost and won”

This is a paradox. It is a paradox because the statement seems to contradict itself, implying that an army can both win and lose a battle. Shakespeare uses this statement to foreshadow the fall of Macbeth. He has won the battle but will soon enter into a situation where he will lose.

OR

“When the hurlyburly’s done, when the battle’s lost and won”

This is a paradox. It is a paradox because the statement seems to contradict itself, implying that an army can both win and lose a battle. Shakespeare uses this to remind the reader that every battle has two sides. Every time somebody wins a battle (in this case, Macbeth and Scotland) somebody else has to lose (Norway). 

 

 

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Author: pattersonmalvern

I am a teacher at Malvern Collegiate Institute. This is a blog to help students keep track of their work.

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