A bit about the stage

Hi Gang,

On Friday you’re going to get our first scripting assignment. I will have you write something specifically for the stage. However, I feel that if we’re going to do this, we need a little understanding of the specifics required in writing for an audience.

 

STORY STRUCTURE

Most plays follow a basic three act structure:

  1. The first act is the Protasis, or exposition.
  2. The second act is the Epitasis, or complication.
  3. The final act is the Catastrophe, or resolution.

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Writing Prompts 5-8

Hey Nerds,

I would like to collect your prompt books again. I’d like them by next Tuesday, January 22nd. This should give me plenty of time to mark em before marks have to go in. Here’s a reminder of the 4 new prompts you should have inside.

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A follow up to last class on planning character

Hey Chumlies,

Last class we talked about how planning characters and their relationships with each other can help in making their dialogue feel more natural. First I did a little activity where I had you consider how you vary the way to speak to different groups of people (using my life as an example). Secondly we did a writing prompt, putting those skills to work.

I mentioned that we were launching into a unit about writing convincing dialogue with Evan this weekend and he had a few words on the matter. Here’s what he had to say. You’ll see he basically repeats everything I told you. This is once again further proof that I am a super genius who is good at everything. Enjoy.

Exposition

Exposition reveals background character and story information. It’s often necessary to tell your story. However, it’s very difficult to make it fell natural. For exposition to work, it’s inclusion must be properly motivated. This is difficult because unless your characters are meeting for the first time, it seems unnatural for them to talk about something they should both already know.

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Prompt 8: Consider Character

Today we did a little opening activity that focused on considering how your characters talk to each other before you even write the first sentence.Well, now let’s start writing those sentences.

Task: Write the opening scene of a play.

Guidelines: You play should have only 2 characters. They need to have a shared history of at least 5 years. Write a sentences to define their relationship and history.

Ex.

  • Marty and Gwen have been married for 20 years.
  • Bill and Kevin have worked at the same Shell station for the last five years. 
  • Meredith and Maddy have been friends on-line since 2003.

Note: Your scene should only introduce the major conflict of your story at the very end.